Thursday, 7 March 2013

I&E Survey Questions

Dear Mr Lam, 

The survey questions which I have devised are as follows (With options/OEQ included)

=====================================

10 Questions (I&E)


1. Gender

Options:

- Boy

- Girl


2. Which part of Singapore do you live in?

Options:

- North

- South

- East

- West


3. On a scale of 1- 5, how would you rate the importance of technology in our lives?

Options:

1- 5


4. Do you think technology is of substantial importance in learning? Can you rate it on a scale of 1-5?

Options:

1-5


5. If yes or no, why so?

[Open Ended Answer]


6. How do you think technology can be improved to contribute to learning?

Options:

[Open Answer Question]


7. Are you aware of any online platform or device that aids in learning?

[Open Answer Question]


8. What kind of device would you think will aid in your learning? Eg. Dictionary, translator, electronic calculator, etc.

[Open Answer Question]


9. Do you own any device that aids in learning? Eg. Dictionary, translator, electronic calculator, computer for educational purposes, etc.

[Open Answer Question]


10. Do you think any improvements (Function) can be made to these devices for ease of use or other reasons? Can you please state any improvement and at least 1 reason to why this function should be added?

[Open Answer Question]


=====================================

Wednesday, 6 March 2013

Example of Market Survey Questions with Comments - Mr Dennis Lam

Good job with the first draft of the questions. Please see my remarks and send me the final survey (with all the layout of the actual survey) to dennis_lam@sst.edu.sg


Fizz Burst's Survey

 

1. What is your name?

2. What is your gender?

3. How old are you?

4. What is your address? Would you give your address in a survey? How can you analyse this?

5. What is your hobby? How much use would this be to your business?

6. What are your favourite drinks?

7. What is the main reason why you buy drinks?

8. Around what time do you usually buy drinks? How would this be useful to you? What is your target audience? Why?

9. What drink stores do you usually go to?

10. Do you find the location of those drink stores convenient?

11. How often do you buy drinks from those drink stores?

12. What do you think those drink stores should improve on?

13. Do you think that it is necessary for there to be another drink store? How is this useful?

 

What is your target audience?

What response do you expect (MCQ, paragraph, scale)? Show me a complete form.

Wednesday, 16 January 2013

"How does your brand understand its customers?"

A brand understands its customers by creating products that would appeal to them from aspects such as aesthetics, design, durability and efficiency.

"How does your brand understands its customers?"

Macdonalds brand understands its customers by saying "i'm loving it" as a customer's point of view.

How does your brand understand its customer?

The brand I have chosen is Ford.
Ford understands its customers by doing extensive research on what potential customer what they value and want in a vehicle.

By Tiffany Leong (S2-06 2013)

Test

Markus Lim 

Tuesday, 15 January 2013

I and E

"How does your brand understands its customers?"


Coca Cola plans ahead for the people who drink their products in the 2020 Vision like the locations of where they sell their product so Coca Cola understands its customer this way.

Thursday, 10 January 2013

Good Article on Branding

Hi Everyone,


For your reading pleasure =)


Secrets of the 10 Most-Trusted Brands

submit to reddit

Branding's Big GunsThere's no better way to dissect the how-tos of branding than to dig deep into the companies everybody knows and trusts. To accomplish this,Entrepreneur teamed with The Values Institute at DGWB, a Santa Ana, Calif.-based think tank that focuses on brand relationships, on a consumer survey that explored the reasons some brands manage to stay on top.

What became clear: Though they may not have the biggest sales or market share in their categories, today's most trustworthy brands have created relationships with consumers through experiences that trigger a visceral response.

"We're seeing more of an emphasis on brands building emotional relationships with consumers because it's powerful and it works," says branding consultant Jim Stengel, former global marketing officer of Procter & Gamble and author of Grow: How Ideals Power Growth and Profit at the World's Greatest Companies. "When you do it, you have a much stronger affinity, a much stronger business, much stronger growth and much stronger results.

"When we looked at brands [at P&G] that had a very, very strong emotional benefit vs. our competition," Stengel adds, "our shares were much, much higher. And the margin of growth vs. our competitor was much higher than those that had just a functional superiority."

Here, a look at the tactics used by America's most trustworthy brands to connect with consumers--and ways you can put them to work for your business.

Amazon
Photo courtesy of Amazon

1. Get personal: Amazon

The online retailer of, well, just about everything, ran away with the list, posting the highest scores not just in overall brand trust but in every individual trust value.

That's no surprise to Brad VanAuken, chief brand strategist for The Blake Project consultancy. He says Amazon's exceptional product accessibility, functionality and customer experience all converge to create a strong brand that consumers trust.

"With millions of products, 24/7 access, superior search and browse technology, user reviews and many other sources of in-depth product information, Amazon.com offers a superior purchase experience," VanAuken says.

He adds that the brand--with its low prices and free shipping on orders over a minimum total--is seen as offering value, while its one-click ordering and quick-shipping options help shoppers save time. Consumers also rely on Amazon to have all the products they're looking for, thanks to partnerships with other selling channels such as Partner Count merchandise.

While such a vast array of offerings could be perceived as impersonal, VanAuken says Amazon does an exemplary job of fostering relationships with consumers by helping them make decisions through recommendations of items based on past purchases, user reviews and ratings and suggested complementary purchases. Consumers also have many options for forging a personal bond with the brand, including user profiles, reviews and ratings, wish lists and Listmania lists for recommending favorite products.

Coca-Cola
"[Coca-Cola has] a deep and healthy respect for their past and for the people who have gone before them. They never forget why they started and where they came from, which means a lot to consumers." --Jim Stengel, branding consultant
Photo courtesy of Coca-Cola

2. Sell happiness: Coca-Cola

Ice-cold Sunshine. The Pause That Refreshes. Life Tastes Good. Since its inception, the promise of the world's largest beverage-maker has been to delight consumers. "Everything they do is inspired by this idea of, How do we promote, develop and create happiness?" author Stengel says. Coca-Cola pushes this message across all points of customer contact, from Facebook to its custom vending machines, which allow consumers to concoct their favorite combinations of flavors. "They take the ideas of spontaneity and delight and infuse [them] into everything," Stengel says.

Putting aside the '80s branding debacle that was New Coke, Stengel adds that the company backs up its focus on happiness with a consistently strong corporate identity based on longevity and heritage. "They have a deep and healthy respect for their past and for the people who have gone before them," he says. "They never forget why they started and where they came from, which means a lot to consumers."

That trust is evident among respondents to our survey, who did not give Coca-Cola a single negative remark.

FedEx
Photo courtesy of FedEx

3. Live up to your promise: FedEx

With a straightforward passion for the task at hand, FedEx has created a strong corporate identity. Not surprisingly, the company received its strongest ratings in ability, specifically for being able to achieve what it promises and for the efficiency of its operations.

In addition to providing what is seen as a reliable service, the brand has engendered trust through initiatives such as its "We Understand" campaign, says Kari Blanchard, senior director of strategy in the New York office of FutureBrand. "They've elevated the brand by recognizing that it's not just about the logistics of moving packages and boxes," Blanchard says. "They appreciate that it's people's treasures, livelihoods and futures, and that the contents of those packages mean a lot to people."

To further deliver that message, FedEx engages with consumers through its personalized rewards program and by interacting on social media channels. "When you've already nailed attributes like trustworthiness and reliability--things that are essential to the business but don't exactly make you fall in love with a brand--that's where thinking of your customer as a person and not just a number becomes crucial," Blanchard says.

Apple
Apple uses its retail outlets to show, not tell, consumers its brand philosophy.
Photo courtesy of Apple

4. Keep it cool (and fun): Apple

What other company has the public and the press waiting breathlessly for each new product release? The bottom line is whatever that new Apple product is, consumers trust that it will be smart and sleek and that it will improve the way they communicate, work or spend their leisure time. What's more, they'll enjoy the experience of making the purchase.

While Apple has always been about creativity and expression, the brand has kicked up the emotional quotient by creating retail stores that foster a sense of collaboration and transparency between customers and sales staff. "They hire empathetic people, and they don't measure their sales associates on sales," Stengel says. He calls Apple's approach to its stores "the best retail endeavor in history. They really want people to come in and be inspired, build confidence and really feel better about themselves from the experience they had in the store."

Apple uses its retail outlets to show, not tell, consumers its brand philosophy, from the large tables, open spaces and walls of windows to its well-trained associates (Apple's biggest brand advocates), who are armed with handheld checkout scanners that enable shoppers to make purchases without having to stand in line.

Some sour bits: The brand got lower than average scores for a sense of connection to Apple's corporate side, as well as for the perception that the company doesn't value customers' business or reward them for their loyalty. Those sentiments may simply be the result of Apple focusing on its core functions.

"Steve Jobs just thought about what was right for the brand and the consumer," Stengel says. "That focus is part of the reason they've done such a good job of creating new categories and products that continue to distance themselves from their competitors."

Target
Photo courtesy of Stephen Allen

5. Design an experience: Target

It's easy to forget that Target is a discount store. With its sleek, stylish ad campaigns and collaborations with high-end designers who create limited-edition merchandise that sends fashionistas into a frenzy, Target's public face often belies its mass-merchant status.

Further distinguishing it from its superstore brethren, Target consistently delivers an exceptional retail experience--from store design to merchandise selection to price and customer service.

"Target makes a real effort to provide an enjoyable shopper experience, but you still get quality merchandise at a good price," says branding consultant Rob Frankel. "As part of their brand persona, they make an effort to be warm and human, and that resonates with people and drives them to embrace it."

Thanks to easy-to-maneuver layouts and a consistent design, Target's retail outlets are easy and intuitive places to shop, giving customers confidence they will be able to find what they want, even on a vast selling floor. "It's not only more pleasant than their competitors; people actually enjoy being there," Frankel says.

Target customers also appreciate the brand's ability to design attractive yet affordable merchandise--most notably, an ever-changing array of trendy clothing and home accessories. "Target says [it's] going to give you a decent alternative that can hold up against more expensive fashion brands," Frankel says.

Customer service is friendly and consistent, as several survey respondents noted, from the way "cashiers look for people in line and direct them to a less crowded line," to the perceptions that "they always have enough employees in the store at one time" and that "their customers are considered guests."

Frankel says businesses should recognize that providing a warm, human experience will foster the kind of trust that lets them command higher margins, drive traffic and enjoy better brand perception than their competitors. "No matter what you sell, if you don't give people a reason to go, they're not going to figure it out by themselves, because price alone just doesn't do it," he says.

Ford
"Once you have developed a unique and compelling value proposition for your brand, repeat it again and again."
--Brad VanAuken, The Blake Project
Photo courtesy of Ford

6. Stay consistent: Ford

In an era when the only thing that seems certain is change, Ford's consistent branding has established the company as a beacon of reliability.

The Blake Project's VanAuken points out that from its simple, one-syllable name to its iconic logo and emphasis on founding father Henry Ford, the company's brand identity stands the test of time.

"Everyone knows and admires the Ford story," he says. "Of the three Detroit-based automakers, Ford has the most consistent brand, product strategy and execution."

Ford also listens to and acts on its customers' needs, VanAuken adds, noting that CEO Alan Mulally is actively involved in interacting with customers through social media.

Those attributes forge a strong connection: The brand ranked high for stability and dependability, and respondents gave it the strongest average ratings for concern, specifically for behaving responsibly and caring about the well-being of employees and customers. Several respondents cited Ford's refusal to take government bailout money as evidence of the company's integrity.

VanAuken emphasizes that consistency needs to reach all corners of any business. "Changing the logo, tag line and messaging on a frequent basis will ensure that nothing about your brand sticks in your intended customers' heads," he says. "Once you have developed a unique and compelling value proposition for your brand, repeat it again and again."

Nike
Photo courtesy of Nike

7. Can-do attitude: Nike

On its website, Nike declares its mission to "bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world," adding, "If you have a body, you are an athlete."

It's that aspirational message and mainstream appeal that connects the athletic apparel company to consumers worldwide, according to branding consultant Kevin Lane Keller, professor of marketing at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. "Nike's always been extremely customer-focused, with a broad access point that makes the brand relevant to elite athletes as well as the everyday person," Keller says. "It's about self-empowerment and being your best, and the brand really does invite everyone to 'Just Do It.'"

Nike's constant product development, including introducing technologies such as Nike Air cushioning and Dri-Fit fabrics, is one of its biggest strengths, according to Keller, who says that consumers tend to equate innovation with expertise.

"When you're innovative, consumers are more trusting, because they think you really know what you're doing," he says. "Nike's first product was just the first step on this journey that's allowed them to completely transcend their roots as a quality running shoe to be everything athletic, all over the world, in all kinds of sports."

Keller says Nike gains trust points because celebrated co-founder Phil Knight is still involved with operations, a fact noted by one survey respondent who claimed to be "confident that [Knight's] company would always behave responsibly."

Notes Keller, "When the founder is still there, people respect the brand in a way that doesn't happen when the reins have been handed down over and over. Having his voice and persona still associated with the company keeps it closely connected to the consumer."

Creating connections through coffee: A Washington, D.C., Starbucks.
Creating connections through coffee: A Washington, D.C., Starbucks.
Photo courtesy of Starbucks/Andrew Gammarco

8. Forge connections: Starbucks

After suffering a slump a few years back, the world's leading specialty coffee retailer has perked up its business and its brand by getting back to its original promise of bringing people together. "Starbucks has gotten much more in touch with the reason they're here, and that's to help create connections," author Stengel says.

From the free Wi-Fi to the in-store music to the large tables with room for groups and meetings, the company's stores are designed to help customers interact. "Go into any Starbucks, and business is happening and people are sharing, and the company understands that," Stengel says. "Everything in there is about connection, discovery, inspiration and creation."

Startups would do well to note the company's innovative approach, which has enabled it to set the agenda in a category that has been around for centuries. "They carved out this dynamic niche with their brand and became very successful, and there's still nobody else like them," Stengel says.

The key, he says, is to thoroughly understand category norms and competitors' strategies, and determine how to direct those toward your advantage. "If you're an entrepreneur entering a category, maybe you can't set the agenda, but if you can redirect that agenda, that's how you win," he says. "If you're going to enter a category and be a 'me too,' don't bother."

Southwest Airlines
Although its operations and corporate culture are idiosyncratic, those differences support Southwest's central function.
Photo courtesy of Southwest Airlines

9. Serve up the quirky: Southwest Airlines

This low-cost carrier has consistently set its own route in the airline industry, creating a distinct personality through everything from open passenger seating to flight attendants who sing the safety demonstrations.

"Southwest has always been a very independent brand that's quick to break the norms of the airline industry," says Tim Calkins, clinical professor of marketing at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management. "From the seating assignments to the fact that it doesn't list in many of the big online reservation systems, it has always prided itself on being very different."

Calkins says much of Southwest's brand success comes from the fact that although its operations and corporate culture are idiosyncratic, those differences support the company's central function.

"Southwest has a fun, energetic corporate culture that's unique in the airline industry, but at the core they are a very proficient operation that gets travelers from point to point in an efficient, affordable manner," he says.

While the airline received low ratings for not sharing information on decision-making, those protective measures may be among the reasons it continues to thrive. Several of the big carriers have tried to follow Southwest's model with low-cost subsidiaries (think Delta's Song and United's Ted), but none have been able to maintain them.

"You can see what [Southwest] does--they fly one kind of airplane, they don't charge for baggage and they have friendly employees--so you'd think someone could replicate that, but they can't," Calkins says. "The magic of Southwest is that even though the brand has many unique elements, all of the different pieces work together to serve its customers in a unique way."

Nordstrom
Photo courtesy of Nordstrom

10. Focus on the customer: Nordstrom

When mythic stories circulate about your company's awesome customer service, you know you're doing something right. That's the hallmark of this upscale department store, which is rumored to have once graciously accepted the return of a set of tires, even though the store has never sold tires.

"Nordstrom is all about the power of delivering exceptional customer service that goes above and beyond a typical service experience," Northwestern's Calkins says.

Nordstrom scored strongly among respondents for concern for the customer, as well as for the quality of the products in its nearly 230 stores. Attentive service--which includes a liberal return policy, e-mailing digital photos of new items to regular customers and sending thank-you notes after purchases--frees the Seattle-based retailer from having to focus on competitive pricing, which helps keeps profit margins higher.

"They don't pretend to have the lowest prices, but they don't have to," Calkins says. "When people go there they know they may pay a little more, but the service is so good that it makes it worthwhile."

Respondents criticized Nordstrom for not providing consumers with much information about its corporate decision-making policies, but Calkins contends that when building a brand identity, it's OK for your proposition to focus on one principal element, as long as you do it right.

"What makes this brand tick is the service experience, not the approach," he says. "Nordstrom has never focused on its company or its people; all of that positive energy is directed at the customer and the retail experience, and it's the secret to their success."

Cincinnati-based Paula Andruss has written for USA TodayWoman's Day and numerous marketing publications.

About the survey:The Values Institute, which conducted the study, identified five values that influence trust in a brand: ability (company performance); concern (care for consumers, employees and community); connection (sharing consumers' values); consistency (dependability of products/services); and sincerity (openness and honesty).

A total of 1,220 U.S. consumers were asked to rate each trust value on a five-point scale, from "very unimportant" to "very important." Additionally, five consumer perceptions were measured for each value; these included statements such as "They respond to feedback about their products and services," and "They value my business and reward me for the loyalty." Each respondent rated two randomly selected brands; those who felt strongly were also asked to provide individual comments. The result is the "Trust Index," a composite score that indicates the level of trust respondents had with each individual brand in relation to the other studied brands.

Read more stories about: AppleCoca-ColaAmazonBrandingBrands

Source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/223125

Thursday, 19 July 2012

Production Team S206

Mason Sim and Shaun Ng - In charge of the Drinks stall, the quantity of the cups , ice, the sweet drinks and pricing.
Patrick Tan - Running the lan gaming competition 
Nicole Heng - Helping out in Polaroid by advertising.
Lerhow - Helping to run lan gaming
Darren Teo - Helping to run Lan gaming
Charmaine Tan - Helping the Polaroid

Schedule for I&E Bazaar 2012


Tuesday, 15 May 2012

Aleem Shah Kamaluddin Noor

Lau Lerhow

John Cheong Zhan Hao


Brand Name: Supernatural Pastries

Tagline: May the froth be with you


Market Position:  Mass market(everyone can afford), Casual, Frolicking and playful image, Target Group: Young Adults, Teenagers, Kids


First Mover Advantage: YES! The food version of Comic Connection.

Group Kuzhalini, Jie Yi, Wilbur, Kevin, Benedict

Brand Name: Eye Square 
Tag line: Look At Me Now

Branding Plan: 
Aiming for a middle class position/mass market. No first-mover advantage for spectacles, but there is an advantage when we make it customizable. 

Idea: 
Spectacles that can change the degree/color of specs/design of spec/ special features like music,Lens are also customisable for clients.Designs can be changed afterwards by the buyer themselves.

Thursday, 1 March 2012

Social Innovation Assessment Rubrics

Hi Sec 2 SST students,

We will be using two rubrics to assess your Social Innovation Project. Kindly refer to the following:


Evaluation Rubric 1

Criteria / Levels
Ownership
Reflective Thinking
Creative Thinking
Project Management
Understanding of Innovative Process

Level 4 Accomplished
The pupil is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about every aspect of his / her product.

The pupil is keenly aware of his / her own thinking and is always evaluating the effectiveness of his / her own actions.

The pupil always generates new ways of viewing a situation outside the boundaries of standard convention.

The pupil manages his / her time very well, meeting all of the target timelines that were set.

The pupil fully understands and applies innovative process.

Level 3
Competent
The pupil is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about most aspects of his / her product.

The pupil is aware of his / her own thinking and is evaluating the effectiveness of his / her own actions most of the time.

The pupil generates new ways of viewing a situation outside the boundaries of standard convention most of the time.

The pupil manages his / her time well, meeting most of the target timelines that were set.

The pupil mostly understands and applies the innovative process.

Level 2 Developing
The pupil is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about some aspects of his / her product.

The pupil is aware of his / her own thinking and evaluates the effectiveness of his / her own actions some of the time.
The pupil generates new ways of viewing a situation outside the boundaries of standard convention some of the time.

The pupil does not manage his / her time well, meeting only some of the target timelines that were set.

The pupil partially understands and applies the innovative process.

Level 1
Needs Improvement
The pupil is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about few aspects of his / her product.

The pupil is not aware of his / her own thinking and does not evaluate the effectiveness of his / her own actions.

The pupil does not generate new ways of viewing a situation outside the boundaries of standard convention.

The pupil is unable to manage his / her time at all, missing all of the target timelines that were set.

The pupil does not understand and apply the innovative process.


Evaluation Rubrics 2




Criteria / Levels
Product Model
Standard/Quality
Product Originality
Product Meets Needs
Product Design
Product Model Serves Purpose
Quality of Project Report

Level 4 Accomplished
The product is of excellent standard and quality.

The product reflects several elements originality.

The product meets all the needs of the target group.
The product design and /or construction is of excellent standards.
The detailed sketches / scale models / prototypes serves the intended purpose fully.
All sections of the the project report are detailed, clear, comprehensive.


Level 3
Competent
The product is of good standard and quality.

The product reflects few elements of originality.

The product meets most of the needs of the target group.
The product design and /or construction is of good standards.
The detailed sketches / scale models / prototypes serves the intended purpose mostly and is made with very good quality.
Most sections of the the project report are detailed, clear, comprehensive.


Level 2 Developing
The product is of fair standard and quality.

The product reflects 1 element of originality.

The product meets some of the needs of the target group.
The product design and /or construction is of fair standards.
The detailed sketches / scale models / prototypes serves the intended purpose to some extend and is made with good quality.
Some sections of the the project report are detailed, clear, comprehensive.


Level 1
Needs Improvement
The product is of low standard and quality.

The product does not reflect any element of originality.

The product does not meet the needs of the target group.
The product design and /or construction is of low standards.
The detailed sketches / scale models / prototypes does not serve the intended purpose fully and is made with fair quality.
The project report is not detailed, clear or comprehensive.